Dental Implants
 
 
 
 


If you are missing one or more teeth, and would like to restore your ability to smile, speak and eat with comfort and confidence, then dental implants may be right for you.

Dental implants are a safe and medically proven method of replacing single or multiple missing teeth.

Technological advancements in dental materials and techniques have improved radically the success rate of implants, enabling many patients to enjoy comfort and confidence in their oral health.

Dental implants are a biologically compatible metal posts that are surgically placed in your jaw bone underneath your gums. During a healing period the bone fuses to the implant post. After which a crown or replacement tooth is attached to this implant post resembling your natural tooth both in appearance as well as function.

 



Implants offer:

1. A feel and look more like natural teeth

2. More confidence when smiling, laughing, speaking and chewing.

3. A secure base for replacement teeth due to integration of bone to implant. Unsecure ill-fitting dentures will be a thing of the past.

4. An alternative to bridgework, which requires some grinding of the adjacent teeth.

5. Help in the prevention of unhealthy bone resorption caused by teeth loss resulting in retaining the natural form of your face.

 




Dental implants can be done instead of traditional bridgework in many cases. This is advantageous to the patient, since the implanted tooth doesn't rely on the neighboring teeth for its support, as it does when bridgework is done, nor does it affect those teeth.

Dental Implants are the treatment of choice whether your missing teeth are the result of injury, disease, or decay.

General good health and adequate bone in the jaw are the key requirements.

Advantages over dentures and traditional bridges

•  They avoid the gum recession and bone loss that often happens with traditional denture use.

•  They're silent and stationary: no wobbling or clicking, and they can't be lost.

•  They don't affect the integrity of neighboring teeth the way bridges do, because they stand independently, in no need of support from their neighbors.

•  They're durable and reliable, with a very high success rate.

•  They preserve bone health by substituting for the missing root, thus providing the mass to help the bone retain its natural size. If nothing were to be in place of the missing root, the bone would resorb.

•  They don't cause any difficulty with eating any particular foods the way dentures can.

After consultation, X-rays and overall examination, our specialists can work together to give you an implant which substitutes for a missing tooth root, or several missing roots. These dental implants are made of titanium and they become bonded to the jawbone. Then your dentist can attach a tooth in that place which will be in appearance and function just like a natural tooth and will be permanent, as long as you care for it the same way you care for your natural teeth.

Since we're all different in our dental status, overall health, and lifestyles, it's hard to predict how long the treatment period will be. It can be as short as 1 day, or as long as several months.

How are dental implants positioned?

The implant itself is cylindrical and looks like a little screw. After it's in place, several months may have to pass to allow it to bond securely to the surrounding bone. While this is happening, you can wear a temporary tooth. When the gum and bone are ready, the new tooth, called a crown, is attached to the protruding end, the abutment, of the implant. This new tooth becomes just a part of your mouth like your natural teeth and you'll probably forget it's there.

Replacing several teeth

This is done in the same way as a single tooth, except that several dental implants are positioned, replacing several missing roots, and the crowns or bridgework are attached. Thus the dental implants support the bridge instead of the neighboring teeth having to do that.

Can dental implants replace ALL of my teeth?

Yes, in the same way they replace one or several. The only difference is, to put it simply, that more dental implants are used and more crowns attached to their abutments.

 

Pterygoid and Zygoma implants:

Pterygoid and Zygoma implants provide a solution for a patient with a severely resorbed jaw bone with minimal surgical trauma and maximum oral function. The zygomaticus implant is an alternative to bone grafting into the sinus area. The implants can be placed in better quality bone, which establishes stable anchorage for non-removable teeth.

Healthy; NEW; Zygomatic implants for a nice smile are a unique alternative for patients who have lost their jawbone; ... Adequate bone in your jaw is needed to support the implant, and the best candidates have healthy gum tissues.The upper back jaw has traditionally been one of the most difficult areas to successfully place dental implants due to insufficient bone quantity and quality and the close proximity to the sinus. If you’ve lost bone in that area due to reasons such as periodontal disease or tooth loss, you may be left without enough bone to place implants.

Sinus augmentation can correct this problem whereas Zygomatic implants can divert it. 

Any patients that have been told that they are not candidates for dental implants due to lack of bone in the upper jaw can benefit from the new zygomatic implant  

Excellent Alternative to Bone Grafting
This zygomatic implant provides an excellent alternative to bone grafting procedures for the severely resorbed jaw bone with minimal surgical trauma and maximum oral function.

We would be very happy to evaluate any individual who has substantial bone loss and may be a candidate for the zygomatic implant treatment.

The upper jaw in the back has traditionally been one of the most difficult areas to successfully place dental implants due to insufficient bone quantity and quality and the close proximity to the sinus.

If you’ve lost bone in that area due to reasons such as periodontal disease or tooth loss, you may be left without enough bone to place traditional implants.

Only One Surgical Procedure Needed
The development of the zygomatic implant presents a unique alternative for total rehabilitation of the severely resorbed maxilla (upper jaw), with only one surgical procedure and without the need for grafting.

This long implant is anchored in the upper jawbone and in the very dense zygoma bone. Fixed teeth can be made within 3 days after the surgery. 

It will take 4 months before the implants really get connected to the bone (osseointegration). After that a final bridge of acrylic or porcelain can be made.

Sinus lift :

The aim of this procedure is to raise the sinus floor in order to develop bone for the placement of dental implants. Several techniques can be used to raise the sinus and allow for new bone to form. Depending on your individual needs, we normally wait four to 12 months before putting the implants into place. After the implants are placed, an additional healing period is required. In some cases, the implant can be placed at the same time the sinus is augmented. This treatment could be suitable if you have lost one or several teeth and an important amount of bone. 

Dental Implant Bone Grafting

Bone grafting is a technique to replace missing bones in our body. Bone grafting for dental implant becomes necessary when the jawbone is unable to support the new tooth. The article will help you understand more about dental implant bone grafting...  

While considering a dental implant for a patient, dentist has to check whether the patient's jawbone can support the new implanted tooth properly. A reduction in the volume of the jawbone is possible due to many factors like, gum disease, injury, infection. If the patient had lost the tooth long back and now wants a dental implant, it is possible that the bone has eroded with time and is incapable of supporting an implanted tooth. The reduced volume of the jawbone may make the dental implant unsuccessful. Thus, it is necessary to check if bone grafting is needed, before the actual dental implant.

What is Dental Implant Bone Grafting?
As discussed earlier, bone grafting is a technique for increasing the volume of the missing or eroded bone. In dental implant, a new tooth is set in patient's jaw. The proper volume of supporting bone is a necessity for successful dental implant. A dental implant may go unsuccessful if the dentist discovers that the supporting bone is reduced in the middle of the implant surgery. So, the first step before starting the procedure of an dental implant, is to check the volume of the supporting jawbone and to perform a bone grafting, if the jawbone is missing/ reduced. Dental implant bone grafting in simple words is harvesting a jawbone that will help in supporting the implanted tooth. The source of the bone used, decides the type of bone grafting. Let us have a look at the various dental implant bone grafting types.

Autogenous Bone Grafting
Autogenous bone grafting uses the bone taken from the patient's body. It gives the best result amongst all types of dental implant bone grafting, as the bone used is natural and has cells that will grow easily. The bones present in the chin or in the rear part of the jaw are used in autogenous bone grafting. In rare cases, the bone is taken from a part, other than the patient's mouth, like the hip bone. When part of the hip bone is used for harvesting, the patient needs to be hospitalized. The patient is anesthetized and the physician removes the part of hip bone by surgery. Using this bone, the dentist will create a platform at the site of dental implant.

Allograft Bone Grafting
Allograft bone grafting uses a cadaver bone or synthetic bone. The use of cadaver bone may sound weird, but this type of bone grafting is legal and is common. There are bone banks that provide these cadaver bones for bone grafting. The cadaver bones are not directly used for bone grafting. They have to be sterilized and tests are performed so that they will suit the patient's body. Use of synthetic materials for bone formation, is also an effective way of bone grafting. This type of bone grafting is called as alloplastic bone grafting. The synthetic material that is used for alloplastic bone grafting is, calcium phosphate. The use of synthetic material stimulates the body to form a natural bone at the site of dental implant.

Xenograft Bone Grafting
Xenograft bone grafting uses animal bones, like a cow bone. The bones are sterilized and processed to make them compatible to the patient's body. They act as fillers, as the patient's body will gradually convert them into natural bones.

Sinus lift graft and block bone grafting are other two techniques of dental implant bone grafting. Both these methods use a different way of harvesting the bone. Once the bone grafting is done, it will take months (6 months to one year) for the grafted bone to blend with the natural bone. The dentist will monitor the bone graft at regular intervals and ensure that the healing is as expected. Once the dentist finds that the bone is completely harvested, it is now capable of supporting the implanted tooth, and dental implant can be done. Bone grafting for dental implant is a lengthy and painful, but a necessary and important procedure that will ensure a successful dental implant.

 

Zygomatic implants

The development of the zygomatic implant presents a unique alternative for total rehabilitation of the severely resorbed maxilla (upper jaw), with only one surgical procedure and without the need for grafting. This long implant is anchored in the upper jawbone and in the very dense zygoma bone. A temporary prosthesis can be fixed immediately after placing the implant and until the final restoration, once the aesthetic criteria have been met and your expectations have been fulfilled. The main advantages of zygomatic implants over sinus lift procedures are the shorter duration of the treatment and the success rate, which is 100% after 5 years, according to scientific studies. 

If you are a patient dissatisfied with your upper removable prosthesis, you should consider this option, because zygomatic implants will give you the opportunity to recover the biomechanics of your original denture.

4 conventional implants + 2 zygomatic implants is one of the solutions.

Treatment Planning

Factors to consider when planning a Zygoma-implant patient:

• Clinically symptom free and pathology free sinuses
• Appropriate radiographic imaging of the maxillary sinuses and zygoma regions
• Possibility of placing at least two ordinary implants in the frontal maxilla
• Possibility of controlling or decreasing bending moments by cross-arch stabilization, decreased cantilevers and balanced occlusion.

 

 
 

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